How to Build a Capsule

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The reasons for having a capsule closet are many, and differ from person to person. Some do it to make their lives easier and save time (less choice makes the morning routine easier), to downsize and create more space or maybe even to cultivate a more sustainable and slow closet. These are also some of the perks with a capsule closet, things like freeing up space and time.

So what is the connection between a capsule closet and sustainable fashion. Well, a capsule closet means you buy less and use more of what you already own.

So how do you get started? You need to start by thinking about a few things.

Your Life

When building a capsule one has to have one’s lifestyle in mind. There is no one size fits all when it comes to capsules. This includes the actual size of the closet.

Do you live in a colder climate or where temps change often? Maybe you need an extra sweater or two. Do you live in a rainy region, then it might be reasonable to include rain clothes.

Do you have a strict dress code at work? Or could you manage with your “regular” closet?

Your capsule needs to be built around and suited to your needs and life, so take some time to think about what situations you do find yourself in.

Your Preferences

You’re the one who will be wearing the clothes, so just like with all other purchases you have to assess what you like. Finding your personal style is one of the keys to a longlasting closet and capsule.

Don’t like pants? Then don’t build a capsule around them. Hate dresses? Then leave them out.

This also includes things like color schemes and the excluding or including of prints. What type of shoes and clothes you feel most comfortable in. Those things that you tend to grab after on days when all feels boring.

Your Closet

How many pieces of clothing do you own? Are you used to circulating between 15 pairs of shoes and you love them all? Well, then I say it’s totally fine to continue with it.

Also, do the clothes fit together? Do you have that one odd shirt that only goes with that one skirt you don’t really like and those boots that make your feet bleed? Maybe it’s not a great piece to keep. At least not a piece to include in a capsule.

No number is right or wrong, so you just have to decide for yourself what seems viable to you.

Tips & Tricks

  • The second step to your capsule closet is usually a purge. Get rid of things you have not worn in a year (or pledge to wear it), things that do not fit or that are damaged beyond repair. If there are items you are not sure of and you do not feel ready to part with, put them in a box and leave it for a few months. If you do not miss it after those months you might be ready to let them go.
  • I like to do a (2:1) ratio of tops and bottoms since I usually get more wears out of bottoms compared to tops.
  • Think about how often you are willing to do laundry. If you are fine with washing your clothes every week you could get by with a pretty small capsule. If you’re like me and you dread laundry time, then maybe it’s wise to up the number of items, especially tops, so you can stretch the laundry dates a bit more.

Inspiration?

Some great accounts to follow that post content about capsule closets and sustainable style are:

Anuschka Rees

Wonder Wardrobe

Style Bee

Un-fancy

 

Ready to get your capsule together?

June: Capsule Challenge

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So, summer is here, don’t really know how or when that happened, but I’m excited. My June challenge is a capsule challenge and initially, I had planned on a 30×30 challenge. This means I would have 30 garments to use for all of June. But then I kinda joined a May30x30 on Instagram, so it didn’t really feel like a challenge anymore.

I asked around for some tips and some people thought I should continue for another 30 days, which would have been a fun idea but the weather had changed a bit too much. Some other fun tips were to stick to only one kind of pattern or color, but if you know me you know I barely wear any color or print so that would have been reeeeally tough.

Finally, I settled on the challenge. I would first do a 10×10 (ten garments for ten days) and then a 6×6 (the more extreme of six items in six days). However, I will not be counting shoes this time just to give myself some kind of freedom.

Have you done any capsule challenges? What are your thoughts on them?

Sustainable Yoga Brands

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Compared to many other sports and workout forms yoga is very low maintenance and you rarely need many, if any, new gear and clothes to start the practice. However, if you do feel like getting some new things to motivate your practice or you have worn out the clothes you wear for yoga, then check out these sustainable yoga brands below!

Yoga wear

Girlfriend Collective

Girlfriend Collective makes trendy yoga clothes from recycled PET bottles. They have many beautiful colors to chose from, some permanent and others are temporary.

PrAna

PrAna makes yoga wear, activewear, and swimwear that is better for both the planet and the people. They use sustainable materials like hemp and organic cotton, as well as recycled materials. They are Fair Trade certified and as they say themselves sustainability is in their DNA.

Vyayama

Vyayama uses only natural and semi-natural (cellulosic) fibers that are sourced sustainably and ethically. They offer both minimalist styles in solid colors and fun printed styles.

Satva

Satva Living makes beautiful yoga wear in many colors. They use both organic cotton and recycled materials for their clothes.

Patagonia

Patagonia is probably the most known brand on this list. They have since long been pioneering sustainable practices in the clothing and activewear sector. They use sustainable and recycled materials in their innovative designs.

Ecoalf

Ecoalf is a Spanish brand that works only with a 100 percent recycled materials. Their motto is “there is no planet B” and they sure live by it.

Organic Basics

Organic Basics is not inherently a yoga or sports brand, but in addition to their underwear, they offer a line of activewear called SilverTech that is made with recycled nylon that is treated with silver to lessen odor and therefore require less washing.

Yoga props

Yoga can require some accessories, many of which can be made of plastic. If you want to make more conscious choices for your props here is a small list of what to think of.

Most important things first: the yoga mat. Many yoga mats are made from plastic, but if you want to make a more sustainable choice look for either recycled materials, sustainably sources natural rubber or even cork! Manduka has a line of eco mats that could be worth checking out!

The same goes for yoga blocks. Your best bet here is either cork or recycled plastics. For things usch as yoga straps and bolster that are usually made from woven fabrics it’s important to choose either organic fabrics (like organic cotton) or naturally sustainable fabrics like hemp and linen.

Feel like getting your yoga on now?

4 Fun Hobbies for Conscious Fashion Lovers

Many people today consider shopping a hobby, which is quite sad. They have made consumption into their hobby and oftentimes it can be their only one. I used to have shopping as a hobby. I used to spend hours of just strolling around stores, during lunch hours, after school or work, or just whenever I had some time to kill. All this gave me was an overfilled and uncoherent closet that always left me feeling like I had nothing to wear. In addition, it cost me a lot of money this mindless spending.

Still, I do love fashion. Like I really love it. But I don’t want to be part of this unconscious consumerism that is going on. So I’ve tried swapping my shopping for other more productive hobbies and here are some tips on things you can do if you love fashion, but don’t want shopping to be your hobby.

Sewing

Learning to sew is not just fun and very fulfilling, it’s also very practical. When you know how to sew you have endless possibilities! You can tailor your old clothes or things you buy, you can completely refashion things into new items or you can make your own things from scratch. Sewing your own things will mean you get a closet tailored to you, both to your body and your style!

So how do you make sewing your hobby? Well, you can always take a course, you could buy (or borrow) a book about sewing, learn from online, or just try it out. It will cost you a bit to start if you do not own a sewing machine or can borrow one, and it will also require some basic tools like fabric scissors and such.

Embroidery

Learning to embroider might not be as practical and useful, as say sewing, but it can be equally fulfilling! Spending time on a certain pattern only to see it start coming together is a lovely feeling. And while it might not make a new garment, it can really give new life to one! Maybe you’ve got some holes or stains in your favorite shirt, that makes it unusable. Well, why not try embroidering some nice flowers over it? Not only broken clothes can benefit from some embroidery. A regular white t-shirt can become a statement piece by adding some colorful threads to it. If your style is leaning towards bohemian this is the hobby for you!

Knitting & Crocheting

In the last few years, the popularity of knitting and crocheting has skyrocketed. There are now several stores (such as Wool and the Gang) providing ready-made kits for making your own sweaters, hats, and cardigans. I have found that knitting can be quite expensive if you want to use quality yarn (which you want, just imagine making a sweater for yourself only to find it to be an itching nightmare…), but to me it’s quite meditative and something to keep my hands busy (instead of scrolling Vestiaire…).

Fashion illustration

If you love drawing and being creative, or maybe you’re just not too interested in producing wearable things, why not try fashion illustration? It won’t add things to your (or your family’s) closet, but it will still give you a bit of that fashion fix. The best thing about having fashion illustration as your hobby is that it is super cheap to start! Sure, if you want to get fancy with it there are expensive pens and brushes, but for starters, a few pencils will do.

So how about you? Do you consider shopping a hobby?

Why You Should be Buying the Most Expensive you can Afford

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Most of us have probably bought some expensive item once only to realize that a higher price is not necessarily a sign of better quality. A higher price can today often be attributed to branding and marketing and thus might have very little to do with the actual quality. This, however, doesn’t mean that you should be buying cheap!

Cheap fast fashion is usually thought to be worth its price, but mostly due to the sad fact that you expect it to be of shitty quality when you pay next to nothing. It’s basically you going in with low expectations and then those expectations turn out to be true.

Even though I have already acknowledged the fact that price isn’t necessarily an indicator of quality, I do believe that we should all buy the most expensive we can afford. And here is why:

Room for Actually Paying the Makers

When a t-shirt costs 5€, there is really no room for paying the makers (unless the brand has no markup), but for a 50€ t-shirt, there is. This does not inherently mean that all 50€ t-shirts are a great buy of superior quality that is made ethically, especially if there is a fancy logo on it or in it.

So even if the price can be an indicator or that the company is paying their makers the best way to actually know if a brand is paying the makers is to do your own research.

You Will Buy Less

This one is simple math. If you buy more expensive items, you’ll have to decrease the amount to be able to purchase. So buying more expensive will force you to buy less, which in itself is a win for the planet, but it will also likely make you take more conscious shopping decisions.

It’s Less Disposable

In today’s society, fast fashion has become the new normal. Fast fashion in itself is disposable since it’s dirt cheap and it would cost you more to repair an item than to get a completely new one.

No one wants to throw away a 200€ dress after three wears because they are sick of it. This will make you consider every purchase more. It feels fine buying a dress from H&M you know you might only wear 2-3 times, but when you invest more in an item, it’s not as disposable and you will feel the need to go for something that will last longer.

You Will Likely Care Better for it

Just like no one wants to throw away something they had to save up for two months, no one wants their expensive hard earned items to break or shrink or lose color. I know myself that tend to be more careful in my handling of delicate silk shirts and cashmere, than with cheaper synthetics. Since we know that one of the most sustainable things we can do with our fashion is to wear it for as long as possible, this is a win.

Do you feel like you handle the purchase and care of a more expensive item differently from a fast fashion one?

How you can score new things without buying

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We know that overconsumption is a problem and that we need to find a more circular approach in fashion, as well as buying less in general. So to follow up my latest post about shopping bans I wanted to share some more ideas on how you can get more variety in your closet without buying anything new.

5 ways to renew your closet without consumption

Swapping

Swapping parties have become a huge thing lately, and it’s because they are a great way of both getting rid of things you don’t like anymore or wear enough, while also scoring some new finds. It’s usually free or at a small fee to attend a swap party. If there are none in your area, why not try organizing your own one? Maybe bring together some friends for a swap date or organize one in your office after work.

Borrowing

Another great option to inject a bit of variety into one’s closet without consumption is to borrow clothes. Borrow from friends, parents, siblings, a partner or whatever makes sense to you. For special occasions like weddings and parties, it’s a great idea to look around with your friends to see if anyone has formal wear you could borrow. Borrowing in your friend group can allow you to attend every party with a new dress without straining the environment or your finances. Borrowing is not only for formal though. I do it for everyday things too. Borrowing a cardigan from my mom when I feel cold, or a shirt from a boyfriend to get that perfect oversize fit.

Refashioning

This one requires a certain amount of craft skills, but don’t be put off, you don’t have to be a tailor to refashion or upcycle garments. One simple thing one can do with an item is to dye it in another color. Maybe you can update your old jeans by cropping them or adding some simple embroidery? Take the sleeves off a t-shirt to make a sleeveless top or crop it to make a crop top? If you are good with sewing the sky is the limit! Dresses can be shortened, made into a shirt, made into a top or redesigned completely into a new garment.

Renting & subscribing

Obviously, this option still costs money. However, it is a way of consuming that means less strain on the planet (sharing is caring) and it can help you avoid expensive purchases you only use once. If you have a thing for trends, subscriptions are a great way of exploring trends without having to expand your closet.

Use (all of) what you own

Most of the time we own a lot of clothes that we barely know exist. It is said that we wear 20 percent of the clothes we own for 80 percent of the time. Just by doing a dig through your piles of clothing you can find an old favorite that you forgot about. It’s like finding money in your pocket you didn’t know you put there!

Start getting creative with what you own. Try using and combining items in a way you never did before, dress up casual items, dress down fancier ones, and add an accessory to elevate a look. With just a few clothing items you can come a long way when combining wisely!

Why and How You Should Do a Shopping Ban

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A shopping ban is exactly what it sounds like, a ban from shopping. But the exact rules for a shopping ban tends to differ depending on who you ask. Most people, however, would include any shopping in the form of clothes and apparel, as well as shoes and accessories. Many would also add any items for the home or tech appliances.

So why should you try a shopping ban, and how do you do it?

Why should you do a shopping ban?

There are many reasons for doing a shopping ban, but I would ultimately say that they all include something. And that is sustainability. Ther reasons might be:

Financial sustainability

It’s quite common for people that are in debt or are facing tough financial times to cut their shopping for a shorter or longer period. It allows them to cut their unnecessary spendings from shopping to better their financial status.

Environmental sustainability

More and more people are getting aware of the fact that overconsumption is killing the planet and the people. Buying less stuff will have a positive impact on one’s personal impact on the world. It will mean fewer resources used to produce products for you, as well as fewer things to have to recycle, reuse, repurpose.

Mental sustainability

There is a reason why Marie Kondo and minimalism have become a big trend. Living with less can give you more time for the things that really matter. If you are a shopaholic and only find joy in buying new things all the time a shopping ban can be a great way to kick the bad habit.

No matter why you want to buy less a shopping ban is a great way to detox your shopping habits.

How to do it?

Set clear rules

The first thing to do is to set rules that work for your situation. If you have kids it might be hard to ban all type of shopping you do, but you could decide that purchases for the children are okay, but not for you. Some people think that gifts are okay to buy, as they are not for yourself. Some people include almost all purchases in a ban, even experiences such as travels, concerts and restaurant visits.

If you have any purchases you know will be needed during the time of the shopping ban, it’s a good idea to write out a list of needed items that are exempt from the ban. You might need to buy a bridesmaid’s dress for your best friends wedding, your running shoes are starting to break, or your computer is really old and you do not know if it will survive the time. The rules are for you to have a better experience and to hold yourself accountable.

Be realistic

This one is probably the most important one. You need to be realistic with both the rules of the shopping ban and during the actual process. What works for others might not be for you. I know people who have done modified shopping bans where they are not allowed to buy anything new, but they can buy second hand.

Also, don’t be a Scrooge for things like your health and wellbeing and don’t feel bad if unexpected expenses come up. You might get a bad toothache that will result in expensive appointments. There is nothing you can do about this (except maybe keeping a buffer for unexpected events), so just deal with it and move on. You simply need to give room to life happening, e.g. it’s okay to replace something you really need that breaks, it will not make you a bad person. The ban is a detox, it is meant to change your habits, not get rid of them all together!

Remove & avoid the temptation

Just like when you’re on a diet (not that I really do diets, because they kinda suck) it’s a good idea to remove and avoid all temptation. Out of sight, out of mind, right?

A great first step in removing temptation is to unsubscribe from all sources that usually triggers your shopping behavior. This can mean unsubscribing from e-mails or send-outs from companies, as well as muting or unsubscribing from brands or influencers on social media. Avoiding temptation can mean that you avoid going into stores all together or at least the ones where you usually shop. It can mean that you avoid going to the mall since it might trigger you. Sometimes it might even involve avoiding certain people that seem to trigger your behavior…

Change your habits

Changing your habits and exchanging them for new (healthier) ones is key to remaining the behavior after the ban is over. Otherwise, you risk returning to bad habits once the ban is off. It doesn’t really matter what you fill your time with, you could swap scrolling through online shopping sites for reading a book, or knitting, or whatever that makes you feel good. But try to swap it for something positive. Sometimes we do not understand how much time we actually spend consuming or looking to consume, but if you use that time wisely, you can come a long way!

Remember it’s not forever

Maybe this seems a little bit contradictive to the last point. Obviously, the intention of the ban is to challenge one’s perceptions and habits. Still, remembering that it’s not forever can help deal with it. Hopefully, when later comes and the ban is over, you won’t have the same urge to buy anymore, and you will have a more conscious relationship to shopping.

Find your creativity

When you are not allowed to follow in your old habits of buying new every time you feel uninspired or bored it is vital to get more creative with what you have. If interior decor is your thing, you could get creative by using items from nature, upcycling things (maybe making a nice candle holder from a glass jar?), or simply rearrange the furniture a bit. If clothing is your biggest vice you could try borrowing from friends, refashion things you already own or try find a way to use something in the not intended way (like a dress as a skirt/top…). I have also found help in using the Cladwell app. It can give you suggestions on how to combine the items you have in ways you didn’t think of before.

Are you up for a shopping ban?