Why You Should be Buying the Most Expensive you can Afford

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Most of us have probably bought some expensive item once only to realize that a higher price is not necessarily a sign of better quality. A higher price can today often be attributed to branding and marketing and thus might have very little to do with the actual quality. This, however, doesn’t mean that you should be buying cheap!

Cheap fast fashion is usually thought to be worth its price, but mostly due to the sad fact that you expect it to be of shitty quality when you pay next to nothing. It’s basically you going in with low expectations and then those expectations turn out to be true.

Even though I have already acknowledged the fact that price isn’t necessarily an indicator of quality, I do believe that we should all buy the most expensive we can afford. And here is why:

Room for Actually Paying the Makers

When a t-shirt costs 5€, there is really no room for paying the makers (unless the brand has no markup), but for a 50€ t-shirt, there is. This does not inherently mean that all 50€ t-shirts are a great buy of superior quality that is made ethically, especially if there is a fancy logo on it or in it.

So even if the price can be an indicator or that the company is paying their makers the best way to actually know if a brand is paying the makers is to do your own research.

You Will Buy Less

This one is simple math. If you buy more expensive items, you’ll have to decrease the amount to be able to purchase. So buying more expensive will force you to buy less, which in itself is a win for the planet, but it will also likely make you take more conscious shopping decisions.

It’s Less Disposable

In today’s society, fast fashion has become the new normal. Fast fashion in itself is disposable since it’s dirt cheap and it would cost you more to repair an item than to get a completely new one.

No one wants to throw away a 200€ dress after three wears because they are sick of it. This will make you consider every purchase more. It feels fine buying a dress from H&M you know you might only wear 2-3 times, but when you invest more in an item, it’s not as disposable and you will feel the need to go for something that will last longer.

You Will Likely Care Better for it

Just like no one wants to throw away something they had to save up for two months, no one wants their expensive hard earned items to break or shrink or lose color. I know myself that tend to be more careful in my handling of delicate silk shirts and cashmere, than with cheaper synthetics. Since we know that one of the most sustainable things we can do with our fashion is to wear it for as long as possible, this is a win.

Do you feel like you handle the purchase and care of a more expensive item differently from a fast fashion one?

How you can score new things without buying

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We know that overconsumption is a problem and that we need to find a more circular approach in fashion, as well as buying less in general. So to follow up my latest post about shopping bans I wanted to share some more ideas on how you can get more variety in your closet without buying anything new.

5 ways to renew your closet without consumption

Swapping

Swapping parties have become a huge thing lately, and it’s because they are a great way of both getting rid of things you don’t like anymore or wear enough, while also scoring some new finds. It’s usually free or at a small fee to attend a swap party. If there are none in your area, why not try organizing your own one? Maybe bring together some friends for a swap date or organize one in your office after work.

Borrowing

Another great option to inject a bit of variety into one’s closet without consumption is to borrow clothes. Borrow from friends, parents, siblings, a partner or whatever makes sense to you. For special occasions like weddings and parties, it’s a great idea to look around with your friends to see if anyone has formal wear you could borrow. Borrowing in your friend group can allow you to attend every party with a new dress without straining the environment or your finances. Borrowing is not only for formal though. I do it for everyday things too. Borrowing a cardigan from my mom when I feel cold, or a shirt from a boyfriend to get that perfect oversize fit.

Refashioning

This one requires a certain amount of craft skills, but don’t be put off, you don’t have to be a tailor to refashion or upcycle garments. One simple thing one can do with an item is to dye it in another color. Maybe you can update your old jeans by cropping them or adding some simple embroidery? Take the sleeves off a t-shirt to make a sleeveless top or crop it to make a crop top? If you are good with sewing the sky is the limit! Dresses can be shortened, made into a shirt, made into a top or redesigned completely into a new garment.

Renting & subscribing

Obviously, this option still costs money. However, it is a way of consuming that means less strain on the planet (sharing is caring) and it can help you avoid expensive purchases you only use once. If you have a thing for trends, subscriptions are a great way of exploring trends without having to expand your closet.

Use (all of) what you own

Most of the time we own a lot of clothes that we barely know exist. It is said that we wear 20 percent of the clothes we own for 80 percent of the time. Just by doing a dig through your piles of clothing you can find an old favorite that you forgot about. It’s like finding money in your pocket you didn’t know you put there!

Start getting creative with what you own. Try using and combining items in a way you never did before, dress up casual items, dress down fancier ones, and add an accessory to elevate a look. With just a few clothing items you can come a long way when combining wisely!

April challenge – shopping ban

Shopping mallIf you didn’t know, during April it’s Fashion Revolution Week. It was created as a reminder of Rana Plaza, the clothing factory in Bangladesh that collapsed on April 24th in 2013 killing 1134 people, and tries to raise the question of fair and ethical conditions within the fashion industry. As a way of honoring this week and the horrible conditions many (most) garment workers face today, I decided to make my April challenge a shopping ban.

So why did I decide to do a shopping ban? Well, mostly because over-consumption is one of the biggest problems in fashion today! In the last decades, the consumption of clothing has drastically increased, while the prices and thus salaries for those making the clothes have gone down. One of the best ways of decreasing one’s own impact through fashion is to buy less, so that’s what I’m doing! One month is a pretty short time, but sometimes it’s harder than you think because our entire society is built around shopping and consumption. We are constantly told to renew ourselves, our closets and our homes and this pressure can make even the most conscious person go crazy. For me, one month is a start and probably, I will challenge myself to a longer period soon.

So what does this small shopping ban entail? Well, it means no buying clothes, shoes, accessories, home decor, books or anything. The only thing I am allowed to consume is necessary stuff such as hygiene products, medicine, and food.

Have you ever tried a shopping ban or have you thought about doing one?