Sustainable Yoga Brands

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Compared to many other sports and workout forms yoga is very low maintenance and you rarely need many, if any, new gear and clothes to start the practice. However, if you do feel like getting some new things to motivate your practice or you have worn out the clothes you wear for yoga, then check out these sustainable yoga brands below!

Yoga wear

Girlfriend Collective

Girlfriend Collective makes trendy yoga clothes from recycled PET bottles. They have many beautiful colors to chose from, some permanent and others are temporary.

PrAna

PrAna makes yoga wear, activewear, and swimwear that is better for both the planet and the people. They use sustainable materials like hemp and organic cotton, as well as recycled materials. They are Fair Trade certified and as they say themselves sustainability is in their DNA.

Vyayama

Vyayama uses only natural and semi-natural (cellulosic) fibers that are sourced sustainably and ethically. They offer both minimalist styles in solid colors and fun printed styles.

Satva

Satva Living makes beautiful yoga wear in many colors. They use both organic cotton and recycled materials for their clothes.

Patagonia

Patagonia is probably the most known brand on this list. They have since long been pioneering sustainable practices in the clothing and activewear sector. They use sustainable and recycled materials in their innovative designs.

Ecoalf

Ecoalf is a Spanish brand that works only with a 100 percent recycled materials. Their motto is “there is no planet B” and they sure live by it.

Organic Basics

Organic Basics is not inherently a yoga or sports brand, but in addition to their underwear, they offer a line of activewear called SilverTech that is made with recycled nylon that is treated with silver to lessen odor and therefore require less washing.

Yoga props

Yoga can require some accessories, many of which can be made of plastic. If you want to make more conscious choices for your props here is a small list of what to think of.

Most important things first: the yoga mat. Many yoga mats are made from plastic, but if you want to make a more sustainable choice look for either recycled materials, sustainably sources natural rubber or even cork! Manduka has a line of eco mats that could be worth checking out!

The same goes for yoga blocks. Your best bet here is either cork or recycled plastics. For things usch as yoga straps and bolster that are usually made from woven fabrics it’s important to choose either organic fabrics (like organic cotton) or naturally sustainable fabrics like hemp and linen.

Feel like getting your yoga on now?

Want to start a yoga practice?

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You might have heard about the perks of yoga and thought that maybe you should try it. Maybe you want to feel more centered, more flexible or get stronger in a gentle way. So where do you start? What do you need to start a practice?

Classes

Well, for starters you do not have to buy an expensive membership to start yoga (unless that is your thing and you have a lot of money to spend, then, by all means, do what works for you!). While it can be nice to go to a led class with a good teacher, in the beginning, to get the technique and basics down, it is not necessary. If you want to try a class, take one at a time and do not sign up for any membership until you find what you like, there are so many different types of yoga and the teacher also has a big impact on how it works out for you. So if you want to do only led classes, my advise is to shop around a bit before you settle down.

If money is tight or you prefer working out at home for your convenience there are also great options out there! I have previously used an online yoga service called Yogobe (most is in Swedish) which gave me access to hundreds of different class videos. This usually has a monthly cost, but it’s usually the equivalent of one 1-3 physically led classes. Another option is the one I am using at the moment, which is YouTube! There are so many free videos out there for everyone, from beginners to more advanced, and my favorite is Yoga with Adriene.

Equipment

What clothes do you need?

Well, one of the best things about yoga is that you do not need to spend a dime on clothes and shoes (unless you want to). All you need is or fitted clothes that do not restrict or move to much (no one wants to have to pull their pants up mid-practice or have their ladies pop out in downward dog…) or looser clothes that stay on (think harem pants).

Shoes are usually a big expense for a sport, but not with yoga! All you need are bare feet, since no shoes or socks are used (although I have problem with cold feet so I like to keep a pair on during warm up).

Then we have the equipment part. The first thing to invest in would be a yoga mat. However, it is mostly for grip and comfort so if you want to try the practice out a bit before splurging you could be fine with a thin mat or towel. Also, if you decide to try out studios many of them offer mats to borrow during the classes.

Except for mats there are many other props that are used in yoga, like blocks, bolsters and straps, but most of them can be subbed for other things. A belt can sub for a strap, books can be used as blocks and blankets can be folded into bolsters.

If you feel like trying out yoga, just do it! There are really low thresholds to starting a practice so don’t let Instagram yogi scare you off from the practice. All you need is you and time.

May challenge: 30-day yoga

May might be 31 one days, but I will be doing a 30-day yoga challenge with Adrienne on Youtube so I figured I will leave it at 30 days only.

There are many perks to doing yoga. It gets your body moving, making you both flexible and strong, as well as giving your mind a workout. It can be like moving meditation, focusing on the breathing and feeling of the moment.

So for the challenge, I will be doing one yoga video a day with Adriene on YouTube (which is completely free). I am doing this to cultivate a habit for myself. I love yoga and have for a long time, but I am quite lazy with finding (or rather taking) the time to actually practice. Living small has been a problem before, but now I have enough space to be able to move comfortably while practicing which is a big plus.

Are you a yoga fan like me?

4 Fun Hobbies for Conscious Fashion Lovers

Many people today consider shopping a hobby, which is quite sad. They have made consumption into their hobby and oftentimes it can be their only one. I used to have shopping as a hobby. I used to spend hours of just strolling around stores, during lunch hours, after school or work, or just whenever I had some time to kill. All this gave me was an overfilled and uncoherent closet that always left me feeling like I had nothing to wear. In addition, it cost me a lot of money this mindless spending.

Still, I do love fashion. Like I really love it. But I don’t want to be part of this unconscious consumerism that is going on. So I’ve tried swapping my shopping for other more productive hobbies and here are some tips on things you can do if you love fashion, but don’t want shopping to be your hobby.

Sewing

Learning to sew is not just fun and very fulfilling, it’s also very practical. When you know how to sew you have endless possibilities! You can tailor your old clothes or things you buy, you can completely refashion things into new items or you can make your own things from scratch. Sewing your own things will mean you get a closet tailored to you, both to your body and your style!

So how do you make sewing your hobby? Well, you can always take a course, you could buy (or borrow) a book about sewing, learn from online, or just try it out. It will cost you a bit to start if you do not own a sewing machine or can borrow one, and it will also require some basic tools like fabric scissors and such.

Embroidery

Learning to embroider might not be as practical and useful, as say sewing, but it can be equally fulfilling! Spending time on a certain pattern only to see it start coming together is a lovely feeling. And while it might not make a new garment, it can really give new life to one! Maybe you’ve got some holes or stains in your favorite shirt, that makes it unusable. Well, why not try embroidering some nice flowers over it? Not only broken clothes can benefit from some embroidery. A regular white t-shirt can become a statement piece by adding some colorful threads to it. If your style is leaning towards bohemian this is the hobby for you!

Knitting & Crocheting

In the last few years, the popularity of knitting and crocheting has skyrocketed. There are now several stores (such as Wool and the Gang) providing ready-made kits for making your own sweaters, hats, and cardigans. I have found that knitting can be quite expensive if you want to use quality yarn (which you want, just imagine making a sweater for yourself only to find it to be an itching nightmare…), but to me it’s quite meditative and something to keep my hands busy (instead of scrolling Vestiaire…).

Fashion illustration

If you love drawing and being creative, or maybe you’re just not too interested in producing wearable things, why not try fashion illustration? It won’t add things to your (or your family’s) closet, but it will still give you a bit of that fashion fix. The best thing about having fashion illustration as your hobby is that it is super cheap to start! Sure, if you want to get fancy with it there are expensive pens and brushes, but for starters, a few pencils will do.

So how about you? Do you consider shopping a hobby?

Why You Should be Buying the Most Expensive you can Afford

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Most of us have probably bought some expensive item once only to realize that a higher price is not necessarily a sign of better quality. A higher price can today often be attributed to branding and marketing and thus might have very little to do with the actual quality. This, however, doesn’t mean that you should be buying cheap!

Cheap fast fashion is usually thought to be worth its price, but mostly due to the sad fact that you expect it to be of shitty quality when you pay next to nothing. It’s basically you going in with low expectations and then those expectations turn out to be true.

Even though I have already acknowledged the fact that price isn’t necessarily an indicator of quality, I do believe that we should all buy the most expensive we can afford. And here is why:

Room for Actually Paying the Makers

When a t-shirt costs 5€, there is really no room for paying the makers (unless the brand has no markup), but for a 50€ t-shirt, there is. This does not inherently mean that all 50€ t-shirts are a great buy of superior quality that is made ethically, especially if there is a fancy logo on it or in it.

So even if the price can be an indicator or that the company is paying their makers the best way to actually know if a brand is paying the makers is to do your own research.

You Will Buy Less

This one is simple math. If you buy more expensive items, you’ll have to decrease the amount to be able to purchase. So buying more expensive will force you to buy less, which in itself is a win for the planet, but it will also likely make you take more conscious shopping decisions.

It’s Less Disposable

In today’s society, fast fashion has become the new normal. Fast fashion in itself is disposable since it’s dirt cheap and it would cost you more to repair an item than to get a completely new one.

No one wants to throw away a 200€ dress after three wears because they are sick of it. This will make you consider every purchase more. It feels fine buying a dress from H&M you know you might only wear 2-3 times, but when you invest more in an item, it’s not as disposable and you will feel the need to go for something that will last longer.

You Will Likely Care Better for it

Just like no one wants to throw away something they had to save up for two months, no one wants their expensive hard earned items to break or shrink or lose color. I know myself that tend to be more careful in my handling of delicate silk shirts and cashmere, than with cheaper synthetics. Since we know that one of the most sustainable things we can do with our fashion is to wear it for as long as possible, this is a win.

Do you feel like you handle the purchase and care of a more expensive item differently from a fast fashion one?

What is Ethical Fashion and Why Should I buy it?

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Today, Monday 22nd until Sunday 28th is Fashion Revolution Week. Fashion Revolution is an organization formed by Orsola di Castro??

What is ethical fashion?

To really define ethical fashion is quite hard. I always saw (and still do see) ethical fashion as fashion that focused on social aspects of the fashion process, ethical and fair trade labor, companies that made sure that workers were paid fairly and worked in safe and humane conditions. This is also often the use I see from a lot of brands promoting themselves as ethical.

In its essence though, ethical fashion is a wide definition of designing, producing and distributing fashion with ethics in mind. This means ethical in regard to all. To the planet, the people within the supply chain, as well as animals. Thus it encompasses both eco-friendly/sustainability, cruelty-free and fair labor.

If we look at an example, Everlane is often championed as an ethical brand. The reason for this is that they are somewhat transparent and use ethical factories. So nothing really about the environment or animal welfare. This is what makes the term quite confusing.

Why is it needed?

According to Fashion Revolution  women in the Guangdong region in China (where a lot of fashion is made) have to work up towards 150 hours of overtime every month. In addition, only about 10 percent of them have access to social insurance. In Bangladesh, the workers are only earning about one-fourth of the living wage, about 44£ a month! At the same time, the amount of fashion that is produced per year has more than doubled since the year 2000. In 2014, we bought 60 percent more garments than in 2000, while only keeping each garment for half the amount of time.

No matter if it’s the planet or the people you are more passionate about, these statistics clearly show that the speed of which the fashion industry is moving at is ever increasing and the planet and the people in the industry are paying the price. Fashion is a huge industry and it has the chance to make a great impact if it were to make sustainable changes.

Why is it more expensive?

Today most of us have access to fast fashion and have probably bought a t-shirt for less than 10€. So it makes sense that a lot of people would be shocked to see an ethically produced t-shirt cost four times as much. Ever since fashion was outsourced to cheaper countries, there has been a race for cheaper. When one country’s labor becomes too expensive (ergo, they get better paid), companies simply move their production to another, poorer, cheaper country. Until that country gets better wages and they move onto the next.

Fast fashion has given us a screwed view of what things actually cost because when you shop for fast fashion there is usually someone else paying. When you buy a cheap t-shirt, there really is no room for paying the workers fairly because after material costs and markups there is next to nothing left for the workers. It’s simple math.

This doesn’t mean that all items that are slightly more expensive pay fair wages. It might just be a higher markup to ear more money. But it’s safe to say that if you cannot believe how cheap it is, you can be pretty sure that someone along the line wasn’t paid.

Who made my clothes?

This is the question that Fashion Revolution wants us to pose to our favorite brands. Even though most brands write in which country the item has been produced, very few share who or even in which factory it was produced. A lot of times they do not even know. The supply chains are today a huge net of factories in many different countries and continents and the traceability is lacking. By demanding brands to answer the question of who made my clothes you are demanding a fairer production and a more transparent production.

So who will you be asking?

How you can score new things without buying

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We know that overconsumption is a problem and that we need to find a more circular approach in fashion, as well as buying less in general. So to follow up my latest post about shopping bans I wanted to share some more ideas on how you can get more variety in your closet without buying anything new.

5 ways to renew your closet without consumption

Swapping

Swapping parties have become a huge thing lately, and it’s because they are a great way of both getting rid of things you don’t like anymore or wear enough, while also scoring some new finds. It’s usually free or at a small fee to attend a swap party. If there are none in your area, why not try organizing your own one? Maybe bring together some friends for a swap date or organize one in your office after work.

Borrowing

Another great option to inject a bit of variety into one’s closet without consumption is to borrow clothes. Borrow from friends, parents, siblings, a partner or whatever makes sense to you. For special occasions like weddings and parties, it’s a great idea to look around with your friends to see if anyone has formal wear you could borrow. Borrowing in your friend group can allow you to attend every party with a new dress without straining the environment or your finances. Borrowing is not only for formal though. I do it for everyday things too. Borrowing a cardigan from my mom when I feel cold, or a shirt from a boyfriend to get that perfect oversize fit.

Refashioning

This one requires a certain amount of craft skills, but don’t be put off, you don’t have to be a tailor to refashion or upcycle garments. One simple thing one can do with an item is to dye it in another color. Maybe you can update your old jeans by cropping them or adding some simple embroidery? Take the sleeves off a t-shirt to make a sleeveless top or crop it to make a crop top? If you are good with sewing the sky is the limit! Dresses can be shortened, made into a shirt, made into a top or redesigned completely into a new garment.

Renting & subscribing

Obviously, this option still costs money. However, it is a way of consuming that means less strain on the planet (sharing is caring) and it can help you avoid expensive purchases you only use once. If you have a thing for trends, subscriptions are a great way of exploring trends without having to expand your closet.

Use (all of) what you own

Most of the time we own a lot of clothes that we barely know exist. It is said that we wear 20 percent of the clothes we own for 80 percent of the time. Just by doing a dig through your piles of clothing you can find an old favorite that you forgot about. It’s like finding money in your pocket you didn’t know you put there!

Start getting creative with what you own. Try using and combining items in a way you never did before, dress up casual items, dress down fancier ones, and add an accessory to elevate a look. With just a few clothing items you can come a long way when combining wisely!